How To Build A Mini Ramp: 4 Feet High

If you are thinking of how to build a mini ramp, then the tools required will include the following – a hammer, impact drill, an electric jigsaw for cutting transitions. A saw to cut 2x4s because mini ramps are made with a lot of 2x4s, tape rule, a decent assortment of drill bits, level; the ramp has to be on the same level. You will also need a chalk line used to see where you place your 2x4s under the plywood when you have started building, as well as a heavy-duty pencil.

The mini ramp will be in two sections, the 8-feet wide and 4-feet wide section which can then be combined later. You must measure the length of the 2x4s with the transitions.

To get the transitions perfect, you take one of the 2×4 and place it on the plywood. For this ramp, we would make a 7-foot transition. So, put the 2×4 on the plywood and screw it together in the middle of the 2×4 precisely at 7 feet. Then you drill a hole at the other edge of the 2×4 and fit a pencil in it, so it touches the plywood. Then mark out the height of the plywood from the 2×4 lying on it with a pencil.

The 2×4 will pivot at that point. Once it’s done, you drag the 2×4 edge fitted with a pen, so it marks a perfect tranny on the plywood. After this, you saw out the marked part of the plywood to get your transition. Flip the other side of the plywood and place the cut-out transition on the other side. Trace and then use your saw to cut it out to get the second transition.

Marking Out

The next step in building the ramp is marking out a line on the transitions. You mark a line every 8 inches on the transitions where you will insert the 2x4s. Start from the bottom of the transition. Make sure the 2×4 is in a level position with the transitions on all sides.

Screw the 2x4s to the transitions; you would want to use at least three screws on each side. Start with the front and back, so the rest of the 2x4s fit in well. Now, the reason we make marks on the transition is, so we don’t measure each time we want to fix it in a 2×4. The line will guide us on where to set the 2x4s with the transition. I recommend using two 2x4s for each line, so there’s extra support for the ramp.

Since we are building a 12 feet wide ramp, remember I said it would be in two sections, 8 feet wide and 4 feet wide. Together makes it 12 feet. So, two 2x4s on each line would hold it up.

The next part is building the flat bottom. You’ll be using a ratchet, just like the one in the image below, to hold your ramp in place. I found this extra strong ratchet (on Amazon) if you are looking for a ratchet that does what it says on the tin.

You take four 2x4s from a rectangle so that you would have four sides. The flat bottom depends on how you want it. But a lot of flat bottoms give you enough time to set up. Let’s say, for example, you want to make 8 feet flat bottom; you start with the rectangle as earlier stated. The length should be 4 feet wide, while the breadth should 7.75 feet long. On the middle section, the 2x4s will be 45 inches, so they are different sized 2x4s than the outside. Make the inside 2x4s be 8 inches apart.

Coping

The next phase is coping. Coping is the essential part of a mini ramp; Make sure your coping is 2 inches at least in diameter. This reason is that 2 inches is the right size for your trucks to lock into for skateboarding tricks on mini ramps. We are making a 12 feet mini ramp, so the coping should be 12 feet long too. The length of the coping depends on the length of the mini ramp you want to build.

After fixing the coping, the next step is the deck. The deck is something you will stand on. It could be 2 feet or 4 feet depending on the standing space you want in your ramp. It’s smaller than the flat bottom because it has to fit right into the templates. Make it 94.5 inches so it fits between the template and can butt up right against the coping. The deck will be 4 feet away from the coping.

Sheeting

With this, the skeleton is ready for sheeting. At this stage, where you connect the transitions to the flat bottom, it must be all levels. So, you push them all up together, and you screw the part of the transitions that touch the flat bottom together, both sides. Screwing at least four different parts would hold it firm. After joining the transitions with the flat bottom, there would be a line where they joined that is perfect for your plywood to match.

Use 2 inches screws for sheeting, that is when you are covering the skeleton with the plywood. Each sheet should have at least four screws on each rim going across. When you put your transition first layer up to the flat bottom layer, stand on it, walk from the bottom up, so it doesn’t get warped in the middle.

Start screwing from the first 2×4, second, and so on so that it bends with the wood rather than starting on the top and going down. Screw by every foot on the plywood. Then fix the deck to the edge of the transition. Avoid any angle and make sure it’s flush with your transition and screw together. Also, put 2x4s at each corner of the deck and screw, so they support it well. For the coping, make a small hole using a drill and use a screw of 3/8 inches, so the screw head doesn’t go through.

Make eight holes in the coping, drilling every 3 feet. Drill 4 screws to hold the coping to the transitions. The other four holes are countersinks so that the screw heads go through the coping. You should use a ½ inch sheet of plywood for the first and second layers.

Then a Masonite for your third layer if it’s indoors or plywood if it’s outdoors.

It’s good to have three layers, so you don’t break through when skateboarding and hurt yourself. If you follow all the instructions here, you should be able to make yourself a durable good mini ramp.